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Smart medicine is better health.

Welcome to Knowledge of Medicine –your internet resource for everything medicine. We provide the best health/medical resources available on the internet for both the professional and patient communities. Our comprehensive searches and selection of those medical internet sites with extraordinary content are provided as educational and informational tools. Medical care delivery must be educational,participatory and collaborative with all health partners. Take charge of your medical knowledge –only you can do it!

Harlan R. Weinberg,MD,FCCP

Educate –Participate –Communicate

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QuickStats:Percentage of Adults Aged 18–59 Years Who Have Ever Been Tested for HIV,*† by Number of Lifetime Sex Partners and by Sex — National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey,2007–2010

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR)

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SAM Junctional Tourniquet Accessory (Axilla) Strap –SAM Medical Products:Recall –Potential Clip Failure

Product failure could cause a potential delay in controlling axilla hemorrhage.
MedWatch Safety Alert RSS Feed

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Notifiable Diseases and Mortality Tables

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR)

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How our research helps cancer patients

IACS_Lab_Shots_492_master.jpgBy Lori Baker

MD Anderson has close to 2,000 doctors. Several hundred never treat patients,yet they are crucial to our mission.

“Our mission is to end cancer,not just provide excellent care,”says Helen Piwnica-Worms,Ph.D.,vice provost of Science. “We don’t yet know enough,so our faculty must include a robust community of researchers who apply their scientific expertise to answer important biological questions.”

According to Piwnica-Worms,delivering on our commitment to finding answers sets us apart.
“Discovery is what distinguishes breakthrough institutions,”Piwnica- Worms says.

Birthplace of new cancer treatments
Basic research,also referred to as laboratory research and discovery science,is a part of MD Anderson’s DNA. Ending cancer requires investments in this type of research,as well as clinical,translational and population sciences research. Many of today’s treatments exist because of yesterday’s basic research. For example,many patients with advanced pancreatic cancer rely on the drug gemcitabine,which is available to them thanks in large part to basic research conducted by William Plunkett,Ph.D.,professor in Experimental Therapeutics.

Plunkett’s discoveries of the metabolism,mechanism of action and clinical pharmacology of the drug led to the rationale for fixed-dose-rate infusion. His work complemented trials conducted by our clinical doctors.

As a result,in 1996,gemcitabine was the first drug for pancreatic cancer approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
Had the science stopped there,only pancreatic cancer patients would have benefited. Thanks to continued research,the drug has since been FDA-approved to treat forms of lung,breast and ovarian cancers. Ongoing research has led to its testing as a treatment in even more cancers.

One discovery builds on another
Leukemia patients around the world also have benefited from Plunkett's discoveries,many of which were made available to patients through collaborations with Michael Keating,M.D.,professor in Leukemia,and co-leader of the Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) Moon Shot. For those with acute myeloid leukemia,he demonstrated that lowering the dose of the drug cytarabine was just as effective and less toxic to patients.

Plunkett's discoveries of how the drug fludarabine worked in the body led to testing it for patients with CLL. The drug prompted a more effective response and survival benefit over what was considered the best treatment at that time.

But the research didn't stop there. Further laboratory work led to combining fludarabine with the drug cyclophosphamide,which proved to be even more beneficial to patients. The combination became the new standard of care worldwide.

"It's very rewarding when your laboratory work leads to benefits for patients," notes Piwnica-Worms,who speaks from personal experience. Her pioneering discoveries in cell cycle checkpoints have been translated into new therapeutic opportunities for cancer patients,particularly for those with triple-negative breast cancer,ovarian cancer,and head and neck cancer.

"We must continue to support discovery science," Piwnica-Worms states. "When I was in training,the field focused on the cancer cell itself,but through continued basic research,we now recognize that it's critical to think of cancer as an organ and to study the cancer cell in the context of its surrounding microenvironment."

We can do things now -- like sequencing whole genomes -- that weren't even ideas 30 years ago,Piwnica-Worms says.

"With the pace of science today,we can't even fathom what we'll be working on 30 years from now. We must continue to position ourselves to capitalize on new technologies and opportunities as they arise."

A longer version of this story originally appeared in Messenger,MD Anderson's bimonthly publication for employees.


To schedule an appointment at MD Anderson,please call 1-877-632-6789 or request an appointment online.


Cancerwise | Cancer blog from MD Anderson Cancer Center

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Vancomycin Hydrochloride for Injection USP,Equivalent to 1 Gram Vancomycin (Sterile Powder) by Hospira,Inc.:Recall –Uncontrolled Storage During Transit

One lot may have experienced temperature excursions during shipment.
MedWatch Safety Alert RSS Feed

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Vancomycin Hydrochloride for Injection USP,Equivalent to 1 Gram Vancomycin (Sterile Powder) by Hospira,Inc.:Recall –Uncontrolled Storage During Transit

One lot may have experienced temperature excursions during shipment.
MedWatch Safety Alert RSS Feed

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Influenza Outbreak in a Vaccinated Population — USS Ardent,February 2014

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR)

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Your Diabetes Care Provider in the Future Is Probably an NP or PA!

Clinical Diabetes Journal current issue

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Prevention of late postpneumonectomy complications using a 3D printed lung in dog models [BASIC SCIENCE]

OBJECTIVES

Repositioning of the mediastinum with implantation of a prosthesis seems the favoured approach to treat late complications of pneumonectomy caused by mediastinal shift. However,the traditional prostheses are not designed specifically for use in the thoracic cavity,sometimes resulting in failure of treatment for many reasons. The aim of our study was to develop a novel prosthesis to promote prevention or treatment of late postpneumonectomy complications.

METHODS

Using 3D printing technology,we created a novel mimetic lung model replicating the native one and then transplanted it into the thoracic cavity of postpneumonectomy dogs to maintain the original position of the mediastinum. Postoperative morbidity and mortality of late complications were compared between transplanted and non-transplanted groups. The safety and feasibility of implanting a 3D printed prosthesis were also evaluated by chest computed tomography (CT) scan and pathological examination.

RESULTS

At the 1-year follow-up,pneumonectomy dogs with 3D printed lungs showed less morbidity and mortality of late complications. CT images indicated dynamic mediastinal shift in pneumonectomy-only dogs with enlarged contralateral lungs. Nevertheless,there was no obvious change in the position of the mediastinum in 3D printed lung transplanted individuals. Moreover,the 3D printed lungs did not cause any additional side effects and revealed good histocompatibility and tolerance of recipients.

CONCLUSIONS

Our experiences indicated the safety,feasibility and efficacy of transplantation with 3D printed lungs for prevention of late postpneumonectomy complications and provided a practical and possibly unique clinical application of 3D printing technology for surgical therapy.


European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery –current issue

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What to expect during a CT scan

QE_CT_Scans_047_master.jpgCT scans or CAT scans are a crucial part of the cancer diagnosis and cancer treatment process. A CT scan takes X-ray images from multiple angles. This allows your doctors to see where the cancer is located and determine whether the cancer treatment is working.

For many patients,CT scans can be a source of anxiety,especially if you’ve never had one before. Many patients call this “scanxiety,”and while it’s a perfectly normal feeling,knowing what to expect can help reduce feelings of nervousness.

Preparing for your CT scan
Before getting a CT scan,there are a few things you should do. Following these steps is essential to ensuring your care team gets the images they need to get a good look at your cancer.

  • Drink 8 to 24 oz. of water or clear juice.
  • Don’t eat or drink anything for 3 to 4 hours before your scan.
  • If you need to have bloodwork done,make sure it is done within two weeks after your last chemotherapy treatment,so the CT technicians know that your kidneys are functioning well enough to handle the oral contrast. Tell the staff if you may be pregnant.

Following this advice is essential to ensuring that your care team gets the images they need to get a good look at your cancer.

What happens during a CT scan?
Before you start the CT scan,you may be given an oral contrast to drink and through an an IV. The oral contrast will help your care team see the scans more clearly. The IV may feel a little warm. Afterwards,you’re ready for CT scan to begin.

You’ll lie down on the table while the donut-shaped machine moves around you,collecting images. A CT scan typically takes about 20 minutes or less.

After your CT test
Some patients who are allergic to the contrast are administered certain medications before a CT test. If that’s the case for you,you may not be able to drive home following the test.

Instead,you’ll need to have a friend or caregiver drive you. Also be sure to drink lots of water after the test. This will help keep you hydrated and improve kidney function.

Results from the scans should be available between 7 to 10 days following the CT scan,but patients should discuss this with their doctors to determine if they need to get the results back more quickly. Waiting for the scan results may bring anxiety,but that is a perfectly normal feeling and there are many ways to cope.

Watch this video to see what happens during a CT scan:

To schedule an appointment at MD Anderson,please call 1-877-632-6789 or request an appointment online.
Cancerwise | Cancer blog from MD Anderson Cancer Center

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