SHOTS -NPR's Health Blog
ZocDoc
ZocDoc
ZocDoc
-----------------------------
NY Organ Donor Network
Making Health Care Safer
Smoking causes immediate damage
Get Smart for Healthcare
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

eHealth Topics

Donate Life America

Bertalan Mesko,MD,PhD
Editor-in-Chief

CDC.gov
CDC.gov

Alzheimer's Disease Education & Referral Center

Colorectal Cancer Screen
Adult Smoking
CDC.gov
Child Safety Network

Healthy Environment,Healthy Kids

NRC Widget

Welcome

Smart medicine is better health.

Welcome to Knowledge of Medicine –your internet resource for everything medicine. We provide the best health/medical resources available on the internet for both the professional and patient communities. Our comprehensive searches and selection of those medical internet sites with extraordinary content are provided as educational and informational tools. Medical care delivery must be educational,participatory and collaborative with all health partners. Take charge of your medical knowledge –only you can do it!

Harlan R. Weinberg,MD,FCCP

Educate –Participate –Communicate

Official NHS health information

Audio clip:Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Be Sociable,Share!

Feraheme (ferumoxytol):Drug Safety Communication – Warnings Strengthened and Prescribing Instructions Changed

Risk of potentially life-threatening allergic reactions.
MedWatch Safety Alert RSS Feed

Content is copyrighted by the respective owners.

Advertisement:
Looking for a rental home or apartment?
www.PutnamRenter.com

Buying or selling real estate in Putnam NY?
www.MovingToPutnam.com

Be Sociable,Share!

6 things to know before radiation therapy

jami.jpgBy Jami Mayberry

As part of my vulvar cancer treatment,I underwent five days of radiation therapy treatments for six weeks.

Going into it,I had no idea what to expect,and after about two weeks,I started to feel like a baked potato that had been left in the microwave too long.

Today,I’m cancer-free,so in the end it was worth it. But it was difficult at times. Here are some things I wish I would have known before starting radiation therapy.  

  • It’s important to be flexible. Your scheduled appointments will be “fluid”. This means from one day to the next,your appointment could be anywhere from an hour early to an hour later. There will be people who cancel at the last minute and others who require more time than expected. Just be ready,and try not get upset by the changes.

  • You will be fitted for a cradle. Not the kind you slept in as a child. Similar to a beanbag chair that hardens to your shape,the cradle will help keep you in place for radiation therapy. Every day I was grateful for the cradle. It allowed the radiation to reach the tumor while protecting the healthy parts of my body.

  • You will be tattooed. Your care team will tattoo a few tiny dots on you in your affected area so they can line up the machine correctly with your tumor. The needle is tiny,and it doesn’t hurt. Still,I cried. I have never had a tattoo,and I didn’t want one. I didn’t know having cancer would mean I would have tattooed dots on me the rest of my life. It’s a little thing,but I wish someone would have told me beforehand.

  • Your skin will begin breaking down,or at least that’s how the doctors describe it. What does that mean exactly? It means your skin will become red and sensitive in the affected area,and then will dissolve. You will have some open burns,but Aquaphor or some other healing ointment can help.

  • It does hurt. The hardest part of treatment for me was climbing back on that treatment table during the fifth or sixth week of treatment. That is where raw courage and strength will be required. It took all my self-discipline to do it. I did it because I want to live.

  • You will have side effects the rest of your life. Just expect it. It’s a small price to pay for surviving cancer. For me,it’s lymphedema,or swelling,in my left leg. Because they took out some lymph nodes,the fluids and blood flow were now getting trapped in my lower leg. But compression sleeves and a compression pump can help reduce swelling and pain. So,there you go. I hope this will help prepare you for your radiation journey. It’s not going to be a walk through the park,but it’s not all bad. You meet some wonderful people in the waiting areas,and the technicians remember your name and start encouraging you.

Cancer is a harsh thing and the treatments are harsh,but you are stronger. Radiation saved my life. I have been cancer free for a year-and-a-half. I am back working full-time and enjoying every day.

So,when things get tough,remember:you can do this. It’s so worth it!

Read more blog posts by Jami Mayberry.

To schedule an appointment at MD Anderson,please call 1-877-632-6789 or request an appointment online.

Cancerwise | Cancer blog from MD Anderson Cancer Center

Content is copyrighted by the respective owners.

Advertisement:
Looking for a rental home or apartment?
www.PutnamRenter.com

Buying or selling real estate in Putnam NY?
www.MovingToPutnam.com

Be Sociable,Share!

Diabetes Mellitus Limits Stem Cell Mobilization Following G-CSF but not Plerixafor

Previous studies suggest that diabetes impairs hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) mobilization in response to G-CSF. In this study,we tested whether the CXCR4 antagonist plerixafor,differently from G-CSF,is effective in mobilizing HSC in patients with diabetes. In a prospective study,individuals with and without diabetes (n=10/group) were administered plerixafor to compare CD34+ HSC mobilization:plerixafor was equally able to mobilize CD34+ HSC in the two groups,whereas in historical data G-CSF was less effective in patients with diabetes. In a retrospective autologous transplantation study conducted on 706 patients,diabetes was associated with poorer mobilization in patients who received G-CSF with/without chemotherapy,whereas it was not in patients who received G-CSF plus plerixafor. Similarly in an allogeneic transplantation study (n=335),diabetes was associated with poorer mobilization in patients who received G-CSF. Patients with diabetes who received G-CSF without plerixafor had a lower probability of reaching >50/μL CD34+ HSCs,independent from confounding variables. In conclusion,diabetes negatively impacted HSC mobilization following G-CSF±chemotherapy,but had not effect on mobilization induced by G-CSF+plerixafor. This finding has major implications for the care of patients with diabetes undergoing stem cell mobilization and transplantation and for the vascular regenerative potential of bone marrow stem cells.

Diabetes Journal publish ahead of print articles

Content is copyrighted by the respective owners.

Advertisement:
Looking for a rental home or apartment?
www.PutnamRenter.com

Buying or selling real estate in Putnam NY?
www.MovingToPutnam.com

Be Sociable,Share!

Heart Valve Repair Significantly Improves Emotional Wellbeing in Patients with Mitral Regurgitation

Patients with severe mitral regurgitation (MR) often suffer from psycho-emotional symptoms,such as depression and anxiety,but after undergoing mitral valve repair surgery patients experience a marked improvement in emotional and physical wellbeing
Newswise News from Society of Thoracic Surgeons

Content is copyrighted by the respective owners.

Advertisement:
Looking for a rental home or apartment?
www.PutnamRenter.com

Buying or selling real estate in Putnam NY?
www.MovingToPutnam.com

Be Sociable,Share!

Rectal cancer survivor celebrates life with 5K race

BillLambert325.jpgBy Bill Lambert

After my my rectal cancer surgery,walking was a challenge. But thanks to my care team,my supportive family and friends and lots of hard work over the past year,I plan to run across the finish line at the 2015 SCOPE Run at MD Anderson on Saturday,March 28.
 
Well,run might be a stretch. But just the fact that I can entertain running that distance is a testament to so many factors. I now feel I’ve come full circle.

My rectal cancer treatment

I once read that getting a cancer diagnosis for a second time is like surviving a plane crash only to be involved later in a train wreck. That sums up how I felt. My recurrence came during my five-year annual CT scan,and I had had no reason to believe anything was wrong.  

The second diagnosis was devastating,but I began treatment:a long,complicated surgery and chemotherapy.
Though the tumor was not large,it was in a difficult location to remove. I was told I would need a two-day long surgery. I was frightened going in,but I had confidence in my surgical team that brought a strange calmness. I knew everything was going to work out. 

Only 14 hours later,my wife held my hand with words of encouragement that the operation was successful. It was time to begin the hard work of recovering.

Recovering from rectal cancer surgery
I began a series of challenges to overcome that tested all my strength and faith. After the surgery,I had bowel obstruction and was forced to go on an all-liquid diet for several months. At the same time,I was undergoing chemo. I lost a lot of weight and lacked energy.  

I had trouble just walking or simply getting out of the bed. But after many physical therapy sessions,I slowly started to regain strength back in my leg and hip. In the beginning,I wondered if I would ever be able to function the way I wanted,but I set baby steps as goals.

My turning point came when I attempted to run one lap at the track and made it. As small an achievement as that sounds,it gave me hope that I could overcome the challenges I was facing and that things would get better.         

It was a long way from my pre-cancer recreational runs of four to five miles but it was a start. Since then,I’ve continued running and am ready for the SCOPE 5K.
 
I will never forget walking the halls of MD Anderson during one of my low points. To anyone just starting the cancer journey,I want to share that there is hope to recover and thrive.   

Register online for the 2015 SCOPE Run at MD Anderson on Saturday,March 28. For more information,email scope@mdanderson.org.

To schedule an appointment at MD Anderson,please call 1-877-632-6789 or request an appointment online.

Cancerwise | Cancer blog from MD Anderson Cancer Center

Content is copyrighted by the respective owners.

Advertisement:
Looking for a rental home or apartment?
www.PutnamRenter.com

Buying or selling real estate in Putnam NY?
www.MovingToPutnam.com

Be Sociable,Share!

Triple-negative IBC patient finds hope in her vision for the future

range327.jpgBy Ashleigh Range

In June 2014,I was awaiting the birth of my second son,David,while juggling a demanding job and raising an 18-month-old,Noah,with my husband,Brad. We had just moved into a home in the suburbs to accommodate our growing family. We were living a fairytale —the American dream.

Our American dream became a nightmare when,at 34 weeks pregnant,I noticed changes in one of my breasts. After a few doctors told me that my symptoms were typical for a woman during pregnancy,I went online. MD Anderson’s website indicated that my symptoms aligned with those associated with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). An ultrasound and biopsy confirmed my worst fears. I did indeed have IBC. To make matters worse,my breast cancer was triple-negative,making it more challenging to treat.

Due to limited knowledge and treatment options for my disease,as well as the aggressive nature of triple-negative IBC,my prognosis is poor. However,I still have hope. In December 2014,after six months of chemotherapy,I learned my cancer had progressed,not shrunk.
Despite my poor response to initial treatments,I was committed to continuing to believe I could be healed. One morning spending time with my sons in our backyard,I envisioned our lives together at the much-anticipated post-diagnosis five-year mark,which will also correspond with David’s fifth birthday.

Creating a vision for the future

It is four-and-a-half years from now,and we are in my Texas-sized backyard. It is three years past the median survival time for someone with my diagnosis —and I am alive.

We are in my backyard celebrating David’s fifth birthday. You and I go and untie one of the many balloons along my iron fence. You read my handwriting on the piece of paper tied to your balloon. Yours says,“Doctors telling me I had ‘No Evidence of Disease.’”Mine says,“David born healthy with no time in the NICU.”

We look around,and the backyard is filled with friends and family,everyone who has walked with us and followed our journey. People have flown in from all over the US,from all over the world. Some of these people we have never even met in person before today.

Each guest waits his or her turn to untie a balloon and read the miracle attached to it. Brad attempts to get everyone’s attention once all the balloons have found owners. He has to use a megaphone to be heard above the commotion.  

Brad shares a simple prayer and thanks all those that have made my cancer journey possible.

And with that,you let go of your balloon,and we watch as hundreds of balloons fill the sky.


Finding hope during triple-negative IBC treatment

This vision helps me keep hope alive. Sharing it with others is my way of planting a stake in the ground:I’m going to do whatever it takes to beat all the odds,and to be here for my boys five years from now. I’m going to keep on hoping.

No matter where you are in your or your loved one’s treatment,you must continue to hope. Hope for a cure,hope for more days,hope for quality of life in the days remaining.

Hope is life-giving and refuses to allow cancer to steal more days from you and your loved ones than it absolutely has to.

Read more about Ashleigh’s life on her blog,where she routinely over-shares about her crazy life raising two boys while battling cancer.

Triple-negative breast cancer is one of the cancers MD Anderson is focusing on as part of our Moon Shots Program to dramatically reduce cancer deaths. Learn more about our Breast and Ovarian Moon Shot.

To schedule an appointment at MD Anderson,please call 1-877-632-6789 or request an appointment online.

Cancerwise | Cancer blog from MD Anderson Cancer Center

Content is copyrighted by the respective owners.

Advertisement:
Looking for a rental home or apartment?
www.PutnamRenter.com

Buying or selling real estate in Putnam NY?
www.MovingToPutnam.com

Be Sociable,Share!

Duodenoscope Model TJF-Q180V by Olympus:FDA Safety Communication –New Reprocessing Instructions Validated

If not properly reprocessed patients may be exposed to serious infections.
MedWatch Safety Alert RSS Feed

Content is copyrighted by the respective owners.

Advertisement:
Looking for a rental home or apartment?
www.PutnamRenter.com

Buying or selling real estate in Putnam NY?
www.MovingToPutnam.com

Be Sociable,Share!

SURVEILLANCE SUMMARIES:Trichinellosis Surveillance — United States,2008–2012

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR)

Content is copyrighted by the respective owners.

Advertisement:
Looking for a rental home or apartment?
www.PutnamRenter.com

Buying or selling real estate in Putnam NY?
www.MovingToPutnam.com

Be Sociable,Share!

Determinants of Shortened,Disrupted,and Mistimed Sleep and Associated Metabolic Health Consequences in Healthy Humans

Recent increases in the prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in modern societies have been paralleled by reductions in the time their denizens spend asleep. Epidemiological studies have shown that disturbed sleep—comprising short,low-quality,and mistimed sleep—increases the risk of metabolic diseases,especially obesity and T2DM. Supporting a causal role of disturbed sleep,experimental animal and human studies have found that sleep loss can impair metabolic control and body weight regulation. Possible mechanisms for the observed changes comprise sleep loss–induced changes in appetite-signaling hormones (e.g.,higher levels of the hunger-promoting hormone ghrelin) or hedonic brain responses,altered responses of peripheral tissues to metabolic signals,and changes in energy intake and expenditure. Even though the overall consensus is that sleep loss leads to metabolic perturbations promoting the development of obesity and T2DM,experimental evidence supporting the validity of this view has been inconsistent. This Perspective aims at discussing molecular to behavioral factors through which short,low-quality,and mistimed sleep may threaten metabolic public health. In this context,possible factors that may determine the extent to which poor sleep patterns increase the risk of metabolic pathologies within and across generations will be discussed (e.g.,timing and genetics).

Diabetes Journal current issue

Content is copyrighted by the respective owners.

Advertisement:
Looking for a rental home or apartment?
www.PutnamRenter.com

Buying or selling real estate in Putnam NY?
www.MovingToPutnam.com

Be Sociable,Share!

Become a bone marrow donor,save a life

bethematch326.jpgBy Gillian Kruse

After starting chemotherapy,it became clear that my acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was going to be tough to beat. The chemo would kill it,but it could come back. To lower the chances of this,my doctors suggested I consider a bone marrow transplant.

I made an appointment to learn about the bone marrow transplant process. Afterwards,my care team and I decided that getting a bone marrow donation was the best option for me. 

The next step was to find a bone marrow donor. 

Finding my bone marrow donor

Both of my younger brothers got tested to see if he could be my bone marrow donor. The best “match”for a donor is one whose cells have the same protein markers as those of the patient.

The more markers that match,the less likely you are to have problems with your body rejecting the transplant after the procedure. Because your protein markers are hereditary,it’s more likely that a patient’s siblings will have similar markings.

In the end,my middle brother Jeff was my perfect match,so we scheduled his bone marrow donation. Once my AML went into remission,I would undergo the transplant.
I’d heard of bone marrow transplants before my AML diagnosis,but all I’d heard was that it was full of lots of pain and giant needles. I thought it was rarely used and only for unpronounceable diseases I saw in documentaries –not something like leukemia.

Through my own AML treatment,I learned that there are two ways to donate bone marrow —through either a surgery or a peripheral blood stem cell transplant. My brother ended up undergoing a peripheral blood stem cell donation,which meant no surgery! For five days,he received a few injections to make his marrow cells leave his bones and go into his veins. The bone marrow donation process was just like donating platelets or plasma.

Once the blood was drawn from my brother’s arm,it passed through a machine that collects the cells needed for the transplant. The remaining blood was returned to his body through a needle in his other arm. It can take up to eight hours to complete the whole process. Not too long,considering it can save a life.

How you can become a bone marrow donor
When I was first diagnosed with AML,lots of friends and family wanted to help out in some way. We couldn’t possibly have taken everyone up on their offers of meals or rides to appointments. But what we could ask everyone to do was to sign up for the marrow registry if they met the health requirements. Even though I was fortunate enough not to need their donations,we hoped they could be someone else’s match and help other patients in the future.

Being an organ donor is not the same thing as being a bone marrow donor. Even if you have the organ donor box checked on your driver’s license,you need to sign up separately through Be the Match,which is run by the National Marrow Donor Program.  

You don’t even have to have a blood test to join. When you let Be the Match know you want to become a possible donor,they mail you a cheek swab test to send back. They will call you if you may be a match for someone in need.

Needing a transplant is scary. But not knowing where your bone marrow donation will come from is worse.

Whenever someone asks me what they can do to help someone with cancer,I always tell them to join the registry. They may never be matched with someone in need,but wouldn’t it be an amazing thing if they were?

Read more by Gillian Kruse.

AML is one of the cancers MD Anderson is focusing on as part of our Moon Shots Program to dramatically reduce cancer deaths. Learn more about our AML/MDS Moon Shot.

To schedule an appointment at MD Anderson,please call 1-877-632-6789 or request an appointment online.

Cancerwise | Cancer blog from MD Anderson Cancer Center

Content is copyrighted by the respective owners.

Advertisement:
Looking for a rental home or apartment?
www.PutnamRenter.com

Buying or selling real estate in Putnam NY?
www.MovingToPutnam.com

Be Sociable,Share!